Monthly Archive: May, 2018

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 9

Giving the translators a break at last! This is the shortest article in the Treaty of Point No Point. Advertisements

Portland’s First Ferry — The Massacre of ’56

(Warning: A disturbing scene to get language data from.)

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 8

This Article of the Point No Point treaty is one that I find relatively hard to translate, with its fancy literary nested-clauses style and its profusion of modals like ‘may’, ‘shall’, and ‘will’… Continue reading

Jargon was current in eastern Oregon by 1845

Eyewitness testimonial specifying that Chinuk Wawa was already being spoken by Eastern Oregon Native people early in the settlement era.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 7

Buying the farm: we get just slightly more specific about money today. Just slightly. 

Weather forecast (Albany, Oregon)

An unexpectedly recurring theme in the pages of old newspapers — talking about the weather in Chinuk Wawa.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 6

Let’s talk money. In a “trade language”, that should be really easy, right? Read on.

Secretary of the Navy gets an Indian name

The ubiquitous Tillikums of Elttaes again! I might have known!

An insult to our great Chinuk Wawa!

Interesting for a post-frontier gilmpse at how Chinuk Wawa was viewed in Oregon in comparison with commercially powerful European languages…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 5

Today’s treaty Article language later got litigated in the momentous Boldt Decision of 1974. That’s how important questions of translation can be…