Monthly Archive: May, 2022

1915: “J. Sox” Brown accepts invitation w/the “sitkum dollar” joke!

Twenty-five years after the closing of the frontier era, this Chinook Jargon from Canadian-born pioneer Josiah Sawyer “J. Sox” Brown (1845-1932) had to be translated for newspaper readers…

James A. Teit writing in Chinook Jargon

Thanks to Dr. Wendy Wickwire…

1947: “Island Indians would greet” Truman in Chinook

At this point, can we find any Commanders-in-Chief who haven’t been spoken to in Chinuk Wawa?!

Takelma and Chinuk Wawa

Thanks to the great advocate of southwest Oregon languages, Patricia Whereat Phillips, for mentioning this new resource on her Facebook feed.

Edna Ferber’s connection with Chinook Jargon

“Ferber’s works often concerned small subsets of American culture, and sometimes took place in exotic locations she had visited but was not intimately familiar with, like Texas or Alaska. She thus helped to… Continue reading

The Klamath language preserves Métis influence

Certain words are extremely important in M.A.R. Barker’s 1963 Klamath Dictionary.

1914: LBDB’s “Chinook-English Songs”, part 1 of 15 “Nau Hy-as Salt Chuck”

Laura Belle Downey-Bartlett was a pioneer girl on Puget Sound who went on to create a major portion of the known artistic material in Chinook Jargon.

1897: Tacoma Redmen

Just post-frontier, an interesting initiative to translate the names of popular Settler dances…

Can you find the Klondike diary of Edward Magawly Banon?

Another “crowdsourcing challenge” for you folks who read this site…

Quinault ‘free’ < CW 'wash(ed)'

Are you as fascinated as I am that Christian hymns are the key to understanding a Quinault Salish word?