Monthly Archive: September, 2021

Circa 1852: A “Pioneer Experience” to back-translate

This happened on an Oregon Settler homestead claim near Cape Horn, below the Cascades of the Columbia River.

There is only one Negative prefix in CW…but it’s attached to a cool fossil

Thinking this over —

Kamloops Wawa humour (part 2: the soupy newspaper)

Like most of the jokes in Kamloops Wawa, this one’s pretty mild & family-friendly.

1881: Jack’s Chinuk Wawa letter

Quileute tribal members (image credit: Peninsula Daily News) Jack’s letter, 1881 as published by Dr. Barbara P. Harris in 1984 revisited by David Douglas Robertson PhD & the Snass Sessions class on August 14,… Continue reading

Listen to “SÁMETL” in CW

Now you can read along and listen to “SÁMEL“…

1792: Moziño, “Noticias de Nutka”, the first clear “Nootka” pidgin (part 2 of 2)

[Continuing from Part 1, yesterday.] Mociño goes on with his description of the local language; on page 53 he notes, …I observed that with some small variations they [verbs] could be turned into… Continue reading

1792: Moziño, “Noticias de Nutka”, the first clear “Nootka” pidgin (part 1 of 2)

I draw pretty clear conclusions from today’s source, but I’m putting out the call to Southern Wakashanists to answer the many questions that follow…

The Cowlitz métis and Chinuk Wawa

One source for information on the métis descendants of Fort Vancouver is the “Summary under the Criteria and Evidence for Proposed Finding: Cowlitz Tribe of Indians” (Bureau of Indian Affairs document, February 12,… Continue reading

1840-1841: The US Ex Ex, the PNW, and the still-local Chinuk Wawa

We get quite the useful picture of how widespread the already-creolized Chinuk Wawa was in 1840-1841, when we absorb this great report:

Didactic dialogues in dictionaries of Chinuk Wawa (Part 1: AC Anderson)

(First in a mini-series.) The credited author disclaimed all responsibility…