“Should” we see Salish influence in Chinuk Wawa commands?

A hot lead, or a cold “should”er? Advertisements

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 11

Prohibition, 1855 racially-segregated style.

Whiskey Joe

Now to Okanagan/Spokane country, from The Coast…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 10

A law talking about laws. 

A Chinook “Wawa Wawa”

Previously on this blog:

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 9

Giving the translators a break at last! This is the shortest article in the Treaty of Point No Point.

Portland’s First Ferry — The Massacre of ’56

(Warning: A disturbing scene to get language data from.)

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 8

This Article of the Point No Point treaty is one that I find relatively hard to translate, with its fancy literary nested-clauses style and its profusion of modals like ‘may’, ‘shall’, and ‘will’… Continue reading

Jargon was current in eastern Oregon by 1845

Eyewitness testimonial specifying that Chinuk Wawa was already being spoken by Eastern Oregon Native people early in the settlement era.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 7

Buying the farm: we get just slightly more specific about money today. Just slightly.