LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 7

Buying the farm: we get just slightly more specific about money today. Just slightly.  Advertisements

Weather forecast (Albany, Oregon)

An unexpectedly recurring theme in the pages of old newspapers — talking about the weather in Chinuk Wawa.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 6

Let’s talk money. In a “trade language”, that should be really easy, right? Read on.

Secretary of the Navy gets an Indian name

The ubiquitous Tillikums of Elttaes again! I might have known!

An insult to our great Chinuk Wawa!

Interesting for a post-frontier gilmpse at how Chinuk Wawa was viewed in Oregon in comparison with commercially powerful European languages…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 5

Today’s treaty Article language later got litigated in the momentous Boldt Decision of 1974. That’s how important questions of translation can be…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 4

Back-translating Pacific Northwest Indian treaties is a revealing exercise; here’s more, and stay tuned for when I get into the Native people’s comments on it…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 3

(Back to: Part 1; Part 2) “On the first day of the council, treaty provisions were translated from English to the Chinook Jargon for the 1,200 assembled natives.”

Linguistic archaeology: Treaty language (Point No Point), part 2

More linguistic archaeology, reconstructing some Chinuk Wawa treaty language.

Linguistic archaeology: Treaty language (Point No Point), part 1

My sense of style tells me to start this very long series (it will be that) on reconstructing the Chinook Jargon used in Pacific Northwest official contexts with the amazingly named…Point No Point!