Monthly Archive: August, 2022

How Father St. Onge’s “Chinuk Pipa” texts link early-creolized with Northern Jargon (Part 2C of 2)

Last installment here — again, thanks for bearing with me during a week of illness. Klaska klatwa saxali kopa mitxwit stik, They climbed the standing trees,  pi kopa sahali lamotai, pi kaltash and… Continue reading

How Father St. Onge’s “Chinuk Pipa” texts link early-creolized with Northern Jargon (Part 2B of 2)

I’ve been sick for several days, so I’ll just drop this here. Kopa ixt mitxwit stik nsaika chako From one standing tree we got  klaxawiam, pi wixt kopa ixt mitxwit stik pitiful, and… Continue reading

How Father St. Onge’s “Chinuk Pipa” texts link early-creolized with Northern Jargon (Part 2A of 2)

Father Louis-Napoléon St. Onge’s “History of the Old Testament”, written in Chinuk Pipa alphabet (“shorthand”) and published in BC’s Kamloops Wawa newspaper in the 1890s, is one of the many “missing links” between southern and northern Chinuk Wawa. 

Circa 1900: Mixed CPE + CW in Idaho

Chinese Pidgin English & Chinuk Wawa spotted in Idaho — a rare bird!

CW in early Washington state numismatics

A historical coin from Taholah on the Quinault Indian Reservation of the Washington coast… Both images from TokenCatalog.com …carries a well-known Chinuk Wawa family name from the Indigenous community. “Good for 5¢ in… Continue reading

1850s: Tyee John hias cumtux

What would you think of seeing samples of how southwest Oregon Natives talked Jargon before they were forced to the brand-new Grand Ronde Reservation?

So many Métis words in interior PNW languages (part 6: Tsilhqot’in Dene)

It’s goofy, but also makes sense, that I’ve overlooked the “Chilcotin” language in my examination of influences from Métis languages on the tribal languages of BC.

1912: Chinook address to HRH the Duke of Connaught

Thanks to Alex Code for pointing out this fun piece. [FYI: this article took me an entire day to write.]

1949: “Chief Chinook” ad in Jargon

Long after the frontier days, Chinuk Wawa remained a powerful symbol of Pacific Northwest identity.

1849-1855: California letters of Lucius Fairchild

Do you enjoy rough and ready frontier prose? I have just the book for you.