Tag Archive: kloshe

Sluiskin’s warning! Kloshe nanich!

(Notice how I’m indulging in exclamations this week?!) Here, for you to practice reading connected Chinuk Wawa speech, is a much fuller account of the 1870 expedition to climb Mt. Rainier that was… Continue reading

Mika tum-tum hyass t’kop (oh brother)

Just to bring alive for you one of the uses we talk about the Jargon having–a “token of pioneer identity”, a “badge of Northwesternness”–I give you the following correspondence, nine letters that were… Continue reading

Chinook Jargon realia I

Chinook Jargon realia I, shown twice life size: A Chinuk Wawa ribbon from my archive with the text on front, WASHINGTON Quanisum pechugh illahee, tenas alta,  delate hyas kloshe, alki.  Kloshe nanitch. And… Continue reading

A trip to Metaline

To paraphrase Daniel Johnston, have you been to Metaline?  If you had visited that mining camp on the BC border in Washington’s first year of statehood, you might have found Chinook Jargon useful.… Continue reading

Chinook Jargon songs, part 4

Let me know if you’ve heard this song, too.  Looks like you can buy a recording of it at Amazon — Dave R. “Mary, Come Home” –from the same book as part 1, part… Continue reading

Chinook Jargon songs, part 3

From the same book as parts 1 and 2 (page 66): found in the 1864-1867 diary of Arthur S. Farwell, ‘later Surveyor-General’ for BC.  (See also part 1, part 2 and part 4.)… Continue reading

Chinook to the rescue

From Everybody’s Magazine (did O. Henry really edit it?).  Volume X, number 2 (February 1904), page 292. “Delate hyas kloshe papah.  Halo kultus wawa kopa ocoke Konaway Tilacums.  Delate skoom kumamook [sic].  … Continue reading

From Copenhagen to Okanogan, part 4

[Final installment.  See previous episodes for more info on this fascinating pioneer memoir…life in the Okanogan Highlands of Washington State, 1880s-1930s.  Most of what I’ve excerpted in this blog happened in the last… Continue reading

From Copenhagen to Okanogan, part 1

Part 1 of a multi-part blog post… “From Copenhagen to Okanogan” by U[lrich] E[nglehardt] Fries, 2nd printing published 1951 by Caxton Printers of Caldwell, Idaho. It’s one of my favorite books for quotations… Continue reading