LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 13

 

indian slavery.jpg

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Short and sweet: no more slavery.

The end to an ancient aboriginal tradition, 1855.

Eight years before President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing African-American slaves, the man who took the post of governor of Washington Territory (which Lincoln had been offered) beat him to the punch.

(Back to: Part 1Part 2Part 3Part 4Part 5Part 6Part 7Part 8.; Part 9 ; Part 10Part 11; Part 12.)

ARTICLE 12.
úkuk táx̣am pi mákwst íkta ɬáska wáwa
this ten and two thing they talk

‘The twelfth thing that was discussed.’

The said tribes and bands agree to free all
úkuk s(h)áwásh-tílixam ɬáska ɬúsh-wáwa dlét ɬáska mamuk-kakwa-stúx̣ kʰánawi ɬaska
these Indian-people they good-say really they make-like-untied all their 
‘These Indian people promise they will in fact set free all their’

slaves now held by them, and not to purchase or acquire others hereafter.
iláytix, pi hílu áɬqi wə́x̣t ɬáska mákuk pi t’ɬáp chxí iláytix.
slave, and not later again they buy or get new slave.
‘slaves, and they will not in the future buy or get new slaves.’

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