Earliest use of phrase ‘Nootka Jargon’?

Thank you, Google Books. This 1890 find may be one of the earliest uses of the phrase ‘Nootka Jargon’. It’s also interesting for what it says about Chinuk Wawa.     Advertisements

Kowrach, “Mie. Charles Pandosy, O.M.I.: A missionary of the Northwest”

Kowrach, Edward J.  1992.  “Mie. Charles Pandosy, O.M.I.: A missionary of the Northwest.”  Fairfield, WA: Ye Galleon. Kowrach was a priest (which order?) who lived in Veradale–the Spokane Valley–in Washington state. I was… Continue reading

Press coverage of independent Chinuk Wawa revitalization

Press coverage of independent Chinuk Wawa revitalization: Read about ‘Urban Scout’.

Smiley = Chinook salmon?

From the ADS-L discussion list archives: Subject: Re: LOL (1989) From: victor steinbok <[log in to unmask]> Reply-To: American Dialect Society <[log in to unmask]> Date: Tue, 12 Apr 2011 11:38:43 -0400 Content-Type:… Continue reading

Thompson River Salish & hymns

An apparently older version of the 1pl form [of ‘independent pronoun’] survives in a religious song: /nmimeł. [Otherwise /nmimł]  — Thompson, Laurence C. and M. Terry Thompson.  1992.  The Thompson language.  Missoula, MT:… Continue reading

“Pneumonic” for “mnemonic”

[Speaker, who is a teacher, says an acronym, then:] “That’s a pneumonic for…” A way of breathing that helps you remember things?  Deep! Heard on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation” today.

Glimpses of Three Coasts

Jackson, Helen (H.H.).  1886.  Glimpses of three coasts.  Boston: Roberts Brothers. [This is a travel book, the sections being I. California and Oregon, II. Scotland and England and III. Norway, Denmark and Germany.–DDR]… Continue reading

Seven Frontier Women and the Founding of Spokane Falls

Cochran, Barbara F.  2011.  Seven frontier women and the founding of Spokane Falls.  Spokane, WA: Tornado Creek Publications.  [Written 1986 or 1987, just before the author’s death.–DDR] page 8:  (in chapter I about… Continue reading

Pig-Tail Days in Old Seattle, cont’d

See my previous post for the bibliographic info on this one.  Picking up where I left off: – page 57, about Spring Street: “The first families had to lolo chuck (carry water) from… Continue reading

Chinook Jargon – Chinuk Wawa

Here’s a new blog.  Chinook Jargon is what I’m actively working on at the moment.  (It’s called Chinuk Wawa in the language.)  I used to run the CHINOOK listserv–which remains a great research… Continue reading