Keel-A-Pie, the Chinuk Wawa operetta (seventh page)

john browns body

(Image credit: Wikipedia)

The truth is marching on! We discover more about the musical sound of this production…

[…] both spears were, by the strength that drove them, imbedded in the tree. I broke them with my tomahawk. Amazed, the men paused for a moment before attempting to strike me with their broken weapons. With my tomahawk I parried their thrusts and sprang upon and killed one. The last man tried to escape by flight, but I pursued and killed him also. 

“My words are true. Mihmy has been restored to her people, and I lay before you the scalps of five victims of righteous wrath. Now I appeal for justice in deciding whether my reward shall be the Council’s consent for Mihmy to choose her husband.”

Sampson: “It was me that found this braggart, bound hands and feet and gagged. I released him else he might have lain there hearing imaginary voices that promised no assistance. When I was about to offer presents to Mihmy’s relatives according to custom, entitling me to become the husband of an orphan, Lem-e-eye told me that she was missing, and I was the first to go in search for her –“

Lem-e-eye (addressing [S]ampson scornfully) : “About to offer presents. Skulking coward! You were cunning to keep your presents for yourself while you dared not try to rescue Mihmy from her captors.”

President of the Council: “It is the decision of the Council that Mihmy shall choose for herself the man she will have for her husband.”

Mihmy runs to Moses, and he embraces her.

Chorus: [1]

“Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Forever ever more.” 

Lah lah lally lou-ly-lou, 
Lah lah lally lou-ly-lou, 
Lah lah lally lou-ly-lou, 
Brave man, fair bride, happy be. 

Tomahawks and scalps, love and cupid’s darts, 
Beaming smiles, lasting joy in lovers’ hearts. 
And they lived happy ever after. 
The old, old story, so ends this chapter. 

“Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Glory, glory! hal-le-lu-jah, 
Forever ever more.”

(End of the first Act.)

ACT II.

Potlatch Festival

SCENE 1.

An Indian village adjacent to the shore of a bay; camp fire on […]

Footnote:

[1] The Chorus’s song is apparently set to the well-known tune of “John Brown’s Body” a.k.a. “Battle Hymn of the Republic“. This is another indication that our operetta was really a pop-culture pastiche, as noted in my posts about its previous pages.

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