St Nazarius & St Celsus (part 2)

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(Image credit: MilanFinally.com)

More and more clues bring us closer and closer to a solution…

(Go back to Part 1, or keep reading…)

Comparing the manuscript & published versions

As promised, I’m going to jump in and compare the two versions we have of the Nazarius & Celsus story.

I’ll format this kind of like my usual “interlinearized” Chinuk Wawa texts, except that here, the first line will be from the manuscript, with my translation of it; then the closest equivalent line from the published version (Kamloops Wawa #159, page 185), and so on.

Starting with the first paragraph of each:

(MS) Nasariyus iaka papa iaka mitlait kopa Rom tawn ankati. Ayu iaka iktas. Ayu wiht iaka ilaitin.
‘Nazarius’s father lived in the city of Rome long ago. He had lots of belongings. He also had a lot of slaves.’
(PUB) Nasariyus iaka taii tanas man kopa Rom ankati. Ayu iaka iktas, ayu ilaitin.
‘Nazarius was an upper-class youth in Rome long ago. He had lots of belongings, lots of slaves.’

(MS) Nasariyus iaka mamuk kanawi ikta iaka tiki: k iaka ayu sahali tomtom, kopit makmak iaka, kopit pli iaka
‘Nazarius did anything he wanted: he was quite arrogant, (and) it was only eating and playing…’
(PUB) Iaka mamuk kanawi ikta iaka tiki; iaka ayu sahali tomtom
‘He did anything he wanted; he was quite arrogant…’

(MS) …tomtom kakwa kanawi taii tanas man kopa Rom.
‘…that he thought of, like all the young nobles in Rome.’

(PUB) …kakwa kanawi taii tanas man kopa Rom. Iaka tiki kwanisim pli, kwanisim kaltash kuli, iaka tiki tlus iktas, tlus makmak, kakwa kanawi taii tanas man kopa Rom.
‘…like all the young nobles in Rome. He wanted to always play, always run around, he wanted fine things, (and) nice food, like all the young nobles in Rome.’

There’s an obvious strong resemblance between the two versions. The published version elaborates on some points, like the decadence of privileged young Romans.

Now the second paragraph:

(MS) Iht son iaka nanich Sin Pitir. Iaka kolan ikta Sin Pitir wawa kopa tilikom:
‘One day he saw Saint Peter. He heard what Saint Peter was saying to the people.’
(PUB) Iht son iaka nanich Sin Pitir, iaka k’olan ikta Sin Pitir wawa kopa tilikom.
‘One day he saw Saint Peter, he heard what Saint Peter was saying to the people.’

(MS) Iawa iaka chako hloima iaka tomtom. Chako sik iaka tomtom kopa kanawi ikta piltin…
‘Then his heart changed. He became sad about all the sins…’
(PUB) Iaka chako komtaks ST, iaka chako komtaks ShK. Chako sik iaka tomtom kopa kanawi ikta piltin…
‘He came to know God, he came to know Jesus. He became sad about all the sins…’

(MS) …iaka mamuk, pi iaka aias tiki chako wash. Iaka klatwa kopa Sin Pitir pus Sin Pitir wa mamuk wash…
…he had committed, and he desired to be baptized. He went to Saint Peter for Saint Peter to baptize…’
(PUB) …iaka mamuk. Iaka klatwa ashnu kopa Sin Pitir; wik lili pi iaka chako wash.
‘…he had committed. He went to kneel before Saint Peter; soon he was baptized.’

(MS) …iaka. Iawa iaka mash kanawi iaka iktas iaka tilikom pus iaka kuli kimta kopa ShK.
‘…him. Then he gave away all his belongings so that he could follow Jesus.’
(PUB) Iawa iaka mash kanawi iaka iktas kopa ukuk ilihi, pus iaka kuli kimta kopa ShK.
‘Then he gave away all his belongings in this world, so that he could follow Jesus.’

These second paragraphs contrast a more limited vocabulary and simpler sentences in the manuscript with the lexically and stylistically more complex published version. it’s as if the manuscript’s author was a relatively new student of Chinuk Wawa, compared with Kamloops Wawa‘s editor and publisher Le Jeune.

This is really a clue that Father Le Jeune was not the author of the manuscript version. Le Jeune definitely had the habit of clarifying other folks’ Chinook Jargon when he published their material in his newspaper, as I’ve shown in a research paper a few years back. But he himself was so busy pumping out large quantities of content for eager Chinook Writing readers (and as a consequence, so fluent in the Jargon) that he rarely if ever showed evidence of editing his own material.

I’m going to leave off for the day here. Tomorrow, expect larger chunks of the two versions, and the chance to make your own judgment about the Mystery of the Anonymous Chinuk Wawa Manuscript!

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