Search Results for: treaty

The 1840 Treaty of Waitangi and the PNW treaties

As Chinook Jargon scholarship steadily advances, we become ever more aware of what it implies that the major “Washington Territory” treaties with Native tribes having been worked out via that Indigenous-oriented language.

Interesting argument — I know Salish as well as any White man, so no big deal that the 1855 treaty was made via Chinuk Wawa

Fifty years after the fact, the controversies over how fair the Isaac Stevens treaties were boiled to the surface in the Settler community. 

Puyallups, treaty negotiations, and Chinuk Wawa

I’m learning good things from “Forked Tongues at Sequalitchew: A Critical Indigenist Anthropology of Place in Nisqually Territory” by Karen Marie Capuder (PhD dissertation, University of Washington, 2013).

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 16: Who were those treaty signers?

Here is a small exercise that to my knowledge I’m the first to try: figuring out which of the Stevens Treaties signers were conversant in Chinook Jargon.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 15

Wrapping things up:

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 14

Here’s a good one: banning Native immigration!

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 13

  Short and sweet: no more slavery.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 12

Education and health care…

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 11

Prohibition, 1855 racially-segregated style.

LINGUISTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: TREATY LANGUAGE (POINT NO POINT), PART 10

A law talking about laws.