Search Results for: stick indians athabaskan

Upper Chehalis Salish as the original Stick Indians?

From George Gibbs’s phenomenal 1877 ethnographic and historical tour de force, “Tribes of Western Washington and Northwest Oregon”…

“Coquelle Thompson, Athabaskan Witness”

From the unusually fine biography of someone whose life spanned from early contact times past World War 2 (circa 1848-1946), we learn some valuable Chinuk Wawa information.

1897: Everette thinks “Stikine” is “Stick Indians”

A self-taught frontier linguist has some odd ideas…

Brush Indians & “stick Siwash”

Just a quick note today, showing you a rare synonym of “Stick Indians”, and the earliest occurrence of the latter.

Beresford 1789 [1786-1787] found no northern NWCoast pidgins

Thanks to John Enrico’s phenomenal “Haida Dictionary” (freely searchable here), I found this additional on-the-spot report from earliest times of Native-Newcomer contact on the Northwest Coast.

Cashman 1900 [1899] and Ahtna Chinuk Wawa / Pidgin English

In south-central Alaska, Ahtna Athabaskan people’s Chinook Jargon (Chinuk Wawa) was as mixed with English as we’ve seen in previously known sources. {Clickable link there.} Stick Indians (Ahtnas), Plate 122 of the Report… Continue reading

So many Métis words in interior PNW languages (Part 3: Interior northern Dene, beyond the Chinuk Wawa zone)

READER CHALLENGE: read on to see if you have ideas about some of the French source words!

So many Métis words in interior PNW languages (Part 2: Interior northern Dene, far limits of Chinuk Wawa zone)

READER CHALLENGE: read on to see if you have ideas about some French source words! I’ve written that certain entire families, and types, of languages are fairly impervious to external influence.

1901: Moose Hall invitation + unique Valdez, AK Jargon

Mockery of the northwesternmost Natives to speak Chinuk Wawa is still evidence of how they spoke it!

1887: Kaska Dena people spoke little Chinook Jargon

A passing remark by known BC Chinuk Wawa speaker and researcher, George Mercer Dawson, helps us understand the geographic limits of CW.