Search Results for: pidgin spanish

A sampler of frontier-era California pidgin Spanish/English/Chinuk Wawa

My readers are steadily treated to the insight (so I claim) that pidgin languages such as Chinook Jargon don’t exist in a vacuum. Advertisements

“Mas” about California pidgin Spanish

Last post, I introduced you to California Pidgin Spanish of the gold-rush times, 1858…now, here is más. This time without Chinook Jargon mixed in. First I want to report that the earliest find I’ve… Continue reading

He expected Chinook Jargon, he got pidgin Spanish?!

This anecdote from south of the known region that Chinook Jargon was used in (Sacramento, CA) unexpectedly yielded what looks like pidgin Spanish being used by Native people there.  The gentleman in question… Continue reading

Clattewah, or, how variant spellings led me to a mixed Spanish-English-CJ pidgin

[ *** Edited for clarity — I posted this late last night 🙂 *** ] A humorous bit about the high cost of living in San Francisco — how timely! A racist one… Continue reading

West Coast CPE, 19th c.

One of the topics that keeps intersecting with my unifying theme of Chinook Jargon is the use of multiple pidgin languages here in the West. 

A. Delano & why Chinuk Wawa was thought to extend to the Rocky Mts.

Not too long ago, I read the Forty-Niner A[lonzo] Delano’s 1854 book: “Life on the Plains and Among the Diggings; being Scenes and Adventures of an Overland Journey to California: with Particular Incidents… Continue reading

“Digger” Jargon keeps surfacing

From Hutchings’ Illustrated California Magazine, Vol. IV no. 4 (October 1859), column “Our Social Chair”, page 185: the popular verse “Lo! The Poor Indian” (originally a section of Alexander Pope’s “Essay on Man“, and… Continue reading

Again, mixed Chinook-English in central BC’s late frontier

A Klondike gold rusher, and later a Pulitzer Prize recipient, today’s author is an attention-getter.

The Western Avernus

This is a book that makes more of a literary impression than a linguistic one, but there’s worthy Chinooking from the British Columbia frontier here.

Cayuses, scouts, friends: more from Meacham

Alfred B. Meacham (1826-1882) was chairman of the Modoc Peace Commission who tried to help stop the Modoc Indian War in southern Oregon and northern California.